write a book
11
Apr

Want to Write a Book? Follow Your Dream

Do you want to write a book? Today I wanted to share something with you that resonated with me. It seems for most of us our dreams and goals come and go. Sometimes our dreams feel close enough to touch, and at other times, they feel so distant that we wonder if it will ever be possible to reach them. The dream of writing a book is of no exception. In fact, it could be one of those dreams that you feel has the least value to both you, your supporters and the world.

Pages you might find interesting:

Your Self-Discovery Journey Starts Here

Jen’s Memoir Journey

How to Write a Book – The Real Guide

Should You Write a Book? Here’s 8 Questions to Ask Yourself First.

 

When you feel a dream has a lack of value for your loved ones, the value in that dream diminishes for you – because if you’re anything like me – a personal dream needs to hold value for everyone in my close circle. If it doesn’t, I feel selfish to want something just for myself.

Perhaps this is the saddest thing I’ve ever said. Can you imagine not wanting to have something just because it only serves you? This is like saying that everyone else has more value. As Empaths, we naturally put other people first. We feel their joy, their sadness, their desire – we feel everything – so someone else’s personal goals and achievements carry a whole other meaning for us. Their goals become our goals – their achievements become our achievements – we are happy to live vicariously through the dreams being met by the people we love. Because their happiness is our happiness. This brings us joy.

Yet, if we flip this on its head for a moment, and put ourselves in the position of the one who’s dream is validated by a loved one, and that they seek their happiness and joy through our achievements, through our happiness and joy, then we can begin to see that it isn’t unreasonable, and it certainly isn’t selfish, to want to reach for the dream you’ve been pocketing all this time.

Just like we feel the sadness or joy from others, the loved ones that surround us also have the ability to feed on our joy or sadness. And when we see it clearly in this way, we can once again begin to appreciate the value in our dreams. Because they do have value. Even if they come and go – the ones that return are the ones we’re supposed to do something with.

Leah Goard, Business/Life Coach, wrote the following this week and I felt it so appropriately timed that I wanted to share it with you:

When writing a book is meant to be, it comes back to us time and time again. 

 Some of our goals and dreams come to fruition so easily that it is as if an unseen hand has done much of the work for us. When this happens, we say it must have been meant to be. On the other hand, when dreams and goals require a tremendous amount of effort, we may interpret this to mean that our dream is not meant to be. However, difficulty is not necessarily a sign that our hopes and plans are ill-fated. On the contrary, difficulties and challenges along the path can be important parts of the project’s overall meaning.  

When everything goes smoothly, we feel blessed by the universe, as if a fleet of angels is guiding and supporting our every move. When things are rough or ambiguous, we sometimes feel that we have been abandoned. And yet, the truth is that we are blessed in both cases. Our angels and guides are always present. They may choose at times to back off and let us figure something out for ourselves, and this is when things seem difficult. But when things are difficult, we learn and grow in specific ways. There is a unique satisfaction that comes to us when we succeed at something that has been a challenge. Our sense of self-reliance expands, and our ability to endure and keep the faith is stronger for having been tested. We learn that we are capable of confronting and overcoming the obstacles in our path, and this empowers us to dream still bigger dreams, knowing that we will not be daunted by the challenges inherent in birthing them. 

When we find ourselves facing difficulties with a particular plan or project, the chances are we know already whether we are meant to continue on or let it go. We simply need to look within ourselves for the answer. When an idea is meant to be, it comes back to us time and time again. Then we know we can go forward, no matter what challenges arise, knowing that it is meant to be. 

Respectfully your guide,

Cheryl
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